Six common mistakes and one advice for innovation challenges

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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Operational efficiency is clearly ahead in idea implementation, while sales and marketing, sustainability and better customer experience count for more than half of all the ideas implemented. By dissecting the innovation challenges that performed the worst – and excluding extrinsic … Read More

Lessons learnt on 164 real innovation management challenges

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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To see more clearly what has worked better – or hasn’t worked – with our own clients in recent, real innovation management initiatives, we’ve selected 10 with different size dimensions, from different countries and continents and a variety of sectors

The first of 3 key success factors of innovation management

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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At Exago, we’ve worked with extraordinary clients, such as Fleury, and others from pharmaceutical, banking, utilities and telecommunications industries – across four continents – to help them mobilise targeted communities to solve key business problems by learning from them and with them.

The idea management challenge. How do they do it?

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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The Brazilian company Fleury – a leading provider of clinical analyses in Latin America – has currently more than 10,000 employees. All can participate in Fleury’s innovation efforts. In 2007, the company initiated a programme to encourage suggestions for how … Read More

Are you using these innovation metrics ?

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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The focus on innovation has been moving to the value within organisations’ people: not only employees but also stakeholders and consumers. Being the human factor a new fundamental driver, how are companies gauging innovation results and capabilites? What metrics are … Read More

Incremental innovation, the nonstop evolution

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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IPhone at Apple, Gmail at Google: these are the results of incremental innovation – of structures, features and processes improvement – typically involving larger numbers of people in these efforts. Thomas Edison, though usually considered an inventor, was in truth … Read More

The new threshold of corporate revolution

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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First, technological revolutions changed operating models. Next day, reorganised business models. The third wave is now forcing management models to evolve. Tomorrow’s success stories will be those of companies whose DNA and best practices enable them to transform their different … Read More

10 best practices for cross-border innovation. Are you set to go?

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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The biggest challenge multinational companies face today is how to build an organisation where collaboration is sustainably enabled by technology, processes, capabilities and behaviours. Where collective intelligence becomes the ‘muscle’ behind innovation. And where people, individually and as teams, work beyond their job description, and everyone, anywhere, can make a difference.

10 best practices for cross-border innovation. Number 10 is all about results

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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No returns, no play. Many innovation programmes have been shut down based on this mindset. How to make sure that yours won’t? Our services and software teams have joined efforts to create a structured model that makes sure idea management works and you, as an innovation executive, regain control of your mission. We have thus developed an idea management formula that produces results. Always.

10 best practices for cross-border innovation. Number 4 sets the beginning and the end

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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Nike’s goal is ‘to bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world’. Barnes & Noble bookstores’ mission statement is ‘to operate the best specialty retail business in America, regardless of the product we sell’. And Starbuck’s motto is ‘to inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup and one neighbourhood at a time’. What is the perfect umbrella for your initiative?

How exactly do we gamify innovation?

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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Exago’s model applies game design techniques and covers most game elements we’ve identified quests (challenges), points, avatars, badges (opinion leader, etc.) and social interaction with the sharing of knowledge and information. It also promotes collaboration (co-creation, commenting and peer evaluation) and competition (the best ideas are chosen by the crowd) – including a system to reinforce a sense of progression and levelling up among participants.

Gamifying innovation: all can play, all can win

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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One of the recurring preconceptions to overcome in any innovation management effort is that only experts are able to innovate. In a sense, it’s someone else’s job, not mine. This makes it difficult to bring people into the process and keep them motivated throughout the journey.

Gami…what? How to make innovation fun

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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We’ve said that gamification mechanics can make innovation management initiatives more appealing and successful, while drawing your people’s attention to key business challenges. But how exactly does this happen?

TIP: The checklist for your innovation programme success

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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Below is a checklist that, in our experience, will increase your odds of successfully implementing innovation initiatives. You will learn that there is never an ideal moment to get started and that you will never have all the necessary components aligned at the same time.

TIP: For those who know the innovation clock is ticking

Cristina BastosBlog, Insights

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Now that the year comes to an end, we have good news and bad news. Let’s start with the bad news: Arthur D. Little’s Innovation Excellence Survey found a growing number of companies realise that they have failed to make innovation everyone’s business. And this is costing them dearly.